Meet the GLEC Team

Unity and Intentionality are part of the GLEC Team's core values. We strive to provide the best training and support to educators in our region. We are excited to learn with you!

Director of Special Education

Tricia Bronger serves as the Regional Cooperative Director of Greater Louisville Education Cooperative (GLEC). Her experience in classrooms includes serving students with disabilities, gifted and talented students, and English as a second language. She has held administrative roles in the state department of education and in higher education. Her pre-service and in-service experience provides well-rounded knowledge and expertise for teaching and learning. As a director, she ensures the mission of the GLEC is to provide professional learning, advocacy, and services that support, lead, and inspire positive outcomes for students with disabilities.

Behavior Consultant

Jim is a school psychologist with 25 years of experience in mental health. From 2000 to 2013, Jim provided special education assessment, consultation, and staff development services for Laurel County Schools. In 2013, Jim joined the newly formed Southeast/South-Central Educational Cooperative as a regional behavior consultant. Jim is certified through the University of Kentucky as a trainer in Trauma-Informed Care, and the National Council for Behavioral Health for Youth Mental Health First Aid. Jim chairs the Kentucky Department of Education's LD Tables advisory panel serves as KDE Liaison for the Kentucky Association of Psychology in the Schools and works closely with the Kentucky Department of Education in several capacities related to special education and mental health supports.

Low Incidence Consultant

Katie Cooper is a Special Education Consultant for the Greater Louisville Education Cooperative, in Louisville Kentucky. She received her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Louisville with an emphasis on Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and Assistive Technology. Before working as a consultant, Katie taught students with moderate/severe disabilities, in Jefferson County Public Schools. She went on to serve as a Low Incidence Resource teacher for JCPS, and an Instructional Coach at Churchill Park School. Katie also specializes in transition and post-school outcomes for students with disabilities. ​

Literacy Consultant

Christy Rhodes holds dual certification in Learning and Behavior Disabilities and Elementary Education from Bellarmine University and did her graduate course work at the University of Louisville. This year marks her twenty-fourth in education, spending it solely in special education as an educator and/or instructional leader. She is a fellow of the Louisville Writing Project (LWP) Cadre XXV and is currently a Strategic Instruction Model Professional Developer in Content Enhancement. Christy strives to be a life-long learner and enjoys collaborating with others to continuously improve instruction for students with disabilities. She is a team member of the Greater Louisville Education Cooperative (GLEC) where she provides support to teachers at Jefferson County Public Schools and the Kentucky School for the Blind as well as works closely with other cooperatives across the State and the Kentucky Department of Education. ​

Math Consultant

Duane Williams is a Special Education Math Consultant for the Greater Louisville Education Cooperative in Louisville, KY. He supports Jefferson County Public Schools and the Kentucky School for the Blind. He works closely with the other Kentucky Special Education Cooperatives and is the Coordinator for Active Implementation work in Mathematics Classrooms in Jefferson County Public Schools with the goal, “to increase the percentage of students with disabilities performing at or above proficient in Middle School Math, specifically at the 8th grade level, with emphasis on reducing novice performance, by providing professional learning, technical assistance and supports to elementary and middle school teachers around implementing, scaling and sustaining evidence-based practices (EBPs) in Math.” This work is done in conjunction with the Office of Special Education and Early Learning, Kentucky Department of Education and the National Implementation Research Network. He earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Louisville and graduate degrees from Bellarmine University.

Special Education Consultant

Kristina Hill earned her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Louisville (UofL), M.Ed. in Special Education from the University of Louisville, and Rank 1 in Special Education (Curriculum and Instruction) from the University of Louisville. Kristina currently works as a consultant for Greater Louisville Education Cooperative, one of nine special education cooperatives that service Kentucky’s regions. Currently, she provides training to the region she serves as it relates to compliance with local, state, and federal regulations and legislation. She works with a state task group that focuses on delivering consistent messages across Kentucky as it relates to individual education program development, progress monitoring training, and co-teaching instructional practices. Kristina worked as a special education teacher for over a decade, teaching students with special needs in grades K-8. She served as an instructional coach for students K-12, and as a resource teacher that supported teacher understanding of the development of individual education programs, progress monitoring, and instructional practices. Her mission is to build others up. ​

OVR Consultant

Kelly Dockery-Brooks is a Pre-EST Specialist for Greater Louisville Education Cooperative. She has worked as an educator within Jefferson County Public School District for the last 28 years. Kelly has been the coordinator of the Project SMART Manager in Kentucky; responsible for providing Project SMART participants with exposure to higher education institutions. Her last six years of teaching have been in a high school setting where she supported ECE and underrepresented students preparing for post-secondary education and career opportunities. As a former Summer Works Job Coach, she has the ability to build and foster positive relationships with our city’s youth, their families, colleagues, employers, and industry supervisors. Kelly was a Career Planner at Jeffersontown High School, where she helped at-risk students find job employment opportunities. As a former Career Planner, she met with students individually and coached them to discover job roles and volunteer experiences that would best align with their individual needs and post-secondary career interests.

Kelly’s goal is to inspire young adults to find their strength and be the best individual they desire.

Office Manager

Ellen holds a Bachelor of Science in Business & Economics from High Point University. Prior to joining GLEC, she spent 20 years in JCPS as a Library Media Clerk and later, an Instructional Assistant at various elementary schools. Ellen is passionate about connecting students with the resources necessary for them to reach their full potential. Ellen often refers to her position at GLEC as “winning the job lottery.” She enjoys spending time with her family, reading and going to the beach.​

OVR Consultant

Stacey Hodges is a Pre-ETS consultant for the Greater Louisville Education Cooperative. Her main goal is to provide students with disabilities an opportunity to thrive in the classroom as they transition into adulthood and post-secondary education or a vocational career. Her background includes eight years as Human Resource representative with United Parcel Service, four years as a Jefferson County Public Schools Career Planner, and twenty-two years as a Career and Technical Education/Cooperative Education teacher. Over the years, she has had the honor of servicing hundreds of students throughout the district with a variety of different backgrounds, disabilities, and cultures. She loves meeting students where they are and watching them grow as individuals. She truly believe in the success of the GLEC transition ready curriculum and the positive impact it has on students with disabilities.

Photos by Jamie Rhodes